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Licensed premises

The majority of complaints about noise from licensed premises are a result of 'entertainment' of some sort. This may be:

  • noise from live or recorded amplified music
  • television or video
  • musical instruments
  • public address systems

Loud music from licensed premises can be particularly problematic at night, as low frequency noise (bass) can often be heard some distance from the noise source.

The Environmental Protection Team of the Council are responsible for investigating noise from premises that hold a premises licence, such as bars, pubs and nightclubs.

If we receive a complaint about noise from a licensed premises we will follow the Councils procedure in relation to investigating nuisance complaints.

In extreme circumstances under the Licensing Act 2003, any responsible authority (which includes the Council and The Police) can request a review of a premises licence if it is felt that any of the licensing objectives are not being upheld. As a result of a review, additional conditions may be imposed, such as changes in licensable activities or a restriction in a premises operating hours.

the Environmental Protection Act 1990 allows us to serve a noise abatement notice where we are satisfied that a Statutory Nuisance exists or is likely to occur. A noise abatement notice is a legal document that requires those responsible for the nuisance to abate it. Failure to comply with such a Notice is a criminal offence and the Council may prosecute if it deems it necessary to do so.

What we can’t do

It is not usually possible for us to deal with behavioural noises, caused by persons congregating outside in smoking areas, or leaving noisily. Dependent on how serious the issue is, this may be considered public disorder and you may wish to contact your Neighbourhood Police Officer.

In some circumstances, licensed premises may have additional conditions contained within their licence which they have to comply with. If you wish to enquire if the Licensed Premises in question does have any additional conditions in place then please contact The Licensing Team at the Council. 

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